Homemade Stem Ginger

Homemade Stem Ginger is so easy to make & so much better than shop bought. Chop finely & add to ginger cakes, puddings or biscuits for a real ginger hit. The syrup makes a delicious ginger cordial.


There’s a slight sense of sadness here at the Kitchen Shed as we pack things away for the winter and wind down the freezer contents. I thought I’d pretty much worked out how to use up all our frozen food until I discovered a bag of ginger which was way too much for a stir fry or curry for two. Seemed to me there was only one thing to do, make some stem ginger and take a jar with us to Guernsey to enjoy over the winter.


Stem ginger is much easier to make than you might think – it’s a case of peeling and slicing the ginger into chunks, covering with water and cooking until tender.


Although some recipes use an “all in one” approach, I prefer to drain the cooking water from the ginger and use it to make a syrup – this way you have greater control over the quality of your syrup because of the more accurate water to sugar ratio.


The ginger is added back to the pan with your syrup and simmered for twenty minutes before transferring ginger and syrup into a sterilised jar.
The tenderness of ginger stems cannot be guaranteed and some recipes recommend blanching three or four times to tenderise the stems. I’ve omitted blanching as freezing the ginger breaks down the cell structure and tenderises the stems, so I’d recommend freezing your ginger before cooking. Also, frozen ginger is easier to peel so it’s a win win situation.


If you’d like to try this recipe for yourself, here it is an easily printable form. Just hit the PRINT button on the recipe card below.

 

5.0 from 4 reviews
Homemade Stem Ginger
 
Prep time
Cook time
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Homemade Stem Ginger is so easy to make & so much better than shop bought. Chop finely & add to ginger cakes, puddings or biscuits for a real ginger hit. The syrup makes a delicious ginger cordial.
Author:
Recipe type: Preserving
Serves: 1 x 500 g jar
Ingredients
  • 325 g (12 oz) fresh ginger root
  • 300 g (1½ cups) sugar
  • Water to cover the ginger
  • 150 ml (3/4 cup) ginger cooking water
Instructions

Optional: Freeze the ginger overnight (freezing tenderises the ginger)
  1. Peel the ginger and cut into 2 cm thick slices.
  2. Add the ginger to a pan and cover (by a couple of centimetres) with water. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer for about an hour until nice and tender.
  3. Lift out the tender ginger pieces and set to one side while you make a sryup.
  4. Measure the cooking liquid and add 150ml back to your pan along with the sugar.
  5. Return to a gentle heat and stir to dissolve the sugar - once the sugar has dissolved stop stirring.
  6. Bring to a boil and simmer gently for about 15 to 20 minutes until you have a nice thick syrup.
  7. Add the cooked ginger back to the pan and simmer gently for 20 minutes before transferring ginger and syrup into a sterilised jar and sealing.
  8. Store in a cool, dry place for up to a year.
Notes
Does not include optional overnight freezing.
Recipe can easily be doubled.
Use the syrup in cocktails or like a cordial with a sparkling water.

Pin Homemade Stem Ginger for later:

Homemade Stem Ginger is so easy to make & so much better than shop bought. Chop finely & add to ginger cakes, puddings or biscuits for a real ginger hit. The syrup makes a delicious ginger cordial.
I’m entering Homemade Stem Ginger into Corina’s food challenge Cook Once Eat Twice over at Searching for Spice.


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37 thoughts on “Homemade Stem Ginger

    • Hello Mary, I haven’t kept mine in the fridge and it’s kept well, there is no sign of mould growth. I’ve got a couple of jars on my pantry shelf I made last October and it is still good to use. I’m hoping it will keep for 12 months like jams or preserves and I’ll update my post this October once I can be sure. Hope this helps 🙂

  1. So glad I found this. I have hunted everywhere here in Los Angeles for stem ginger with no success and could only find it online. Americans have no idea what it is. I can’t wait to make my own batch now. Thank you!

  2. Hi I was just wondering if the ginger needs defrosting before starting this recipe? It does look delicious. Also how long does it keep for unopened?

    • Hi Hannah, thanks for stopping by. Yes the ginger does need to be defrosted before starting. As far as how long the ginger keeps, I’ve made a few jars now and I’ve got a jar that is 6 months old and still ok. I”m going to keep it a year and try it just to check it will keep for that long like other sugar based preserving methods. Thanks for stopping by and do let me know how you get on 🙂

  3. Well, I’m so very glad I saw this post on #cookonceeattwice. I love the idea of making your own stem ginger and I’ve now learnt you can freeze ginger – wow! What brilliant Christmas gifts these would make.

    • Thanks Choclette, glad you saw the post on #CookOnceEatTwice. The ginger grates much more easily when it’s frozen too so it’s a win win situation.

    • Thanks Boris, the flavour has all the ginger fruitiness and heat with a delicious sweet finish, perfect for ginger cookies or a cake.

    • Thanks Kate, I’ve made two more batches since so I have enough for gifts – I am saving a jar or two for us though 🙂

  4. I love ginger whether its in savoury dishes or in desserts. But I have never tried homemade stem ginger before, sound really aromatic and delicious. Will definitely give this a go. 🙂

    • You’re most welcome Rosie, I couldn’t find any in Brittany either. The chocolate and stem ginger tiffin looked delicious didn’t it? Thanks for popping by, let me know how you get on 🙂

  5. I love how easy this is to make Sarah. I love stem ginger it has a great flavour and clearly homemade would have an amazing flavour. great tip too about freezing the ginger root first. Definitely going to try this. Pinning.
    Angela x

    • Thanks Angela, if you love stem ginger then you’ll absolutely love making your own. Thanks for pinning, let me know how you get on x

    • Thanks Candace, it is so easy to make, I think people are put off making it because they think it’s a difficult process.

    • Thanks Kirsty, homemade gifts are so much more personal aren’t they? It also cuts down on all that Christmas shopping. x

    • Thanks Mandy, I’m going to make a few more jars to add to my Christmas hampers. Always a pleasure to link up to #CookBlogShare x

    • That’s handy to know, it’s almost the same method as making candied ginger except the sugar syrup isn’t crystallised. Thanks for popping by Lisa 🙂

  6. I bake a lot using stem ginger, this is such a brilliant idea. Once our kitchen has been refitted I will definitely be making this. Great tip about freezing first too. I’ve found that with blackcurrants, freeze first and it cuts the jam Making session in half! Brilliant post x.

    • Thanks Sammie, you’ll be surprised how much better homemade tastes. Thanks for the tip about frozen blackcurrants, it’s my favourite jam, I’ll remember to freeze them first next year. A refitted kitchen sounds exciting, look forward to seeing it on IG x

    • Thanks Vicki, I love preserving and I’m always looking at the ingredients label on store bought jars to figure out how it’s made, very sad I know! It’s a pleasure to share 🙂

    • Thanks Eb, it really is easy to make. Jars of stem ginger are going into my Christmas hampers this year, I’m hoping friends and family enjoy it x

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