Skip to Content

Homemade Clotted Cream

Homemade Clotted Cream is quick and easy to make. Deliciously decadent served with warm scones and homemade jam for a perfect cream tea.

No oven required, no 12 hours of baking and no leftover whey. You can produce a silky, creamy clotted cream with a delicious golden crust in around an hour using your stovetop.

Rich and thick with the consistency of soft butter, clotted cream is inextricably linked with a Devon or Cornish cream tea and there’s nothing quite like it. I’ll leave it to you to decide whether to load your scone with jam first or home made clotted cream first, either way, the result is divine.

Close up image of a large spoonful of homemade clotted cream being scraped from a dish of cream.

I first tried making clotted cream while I was living in France after I promised our French neighbours an authentic Devon Cream tea. I knew it wouldn’t be easy to get hold of clotted cream and creme fraiche, delicious as it is, just wouldn’t do.

As I was trawling through recipes I came across a stovetop method for making clotted cream in an old WI booklet. The minimal effort of stirring cream for 20 minutes seemed much better than a long, slow cooking of cream in a low oven. After working out the ratio of cream to butter and the quantities, I had a go.

The results were far better than I expected and just as good as the pots I used to buy. A cream tea with homemade scones and strawberry jam topped with clotted cream became a regular occasion at the Kitchen Shed. This is the best recipe for homemade clotted cream and has been requested by neighbours and expats alike.

Split scone spread with cream and butter with a pot of homemade clotted cream in the background.

What do you need ?

  1. Fresh double cream or heavy cream, not UHT or ultra-pasteurized. I used Guernsey cream (regular readers know I love all things Guernsey) as this gives a much richer and creamier flavour but regular double cream works too. Regular double cream will make a buttery pale yellow colour clotted cream.
  2. Unsalted butter. Again, if you can get Guernsey butter I recommend it. Butter helps gives an extra creaminess to the finished clotted cream.
Large shallow ceramic dish filled with clotted cream and a spoonful being taken out.

How to make Homemade Clotted Cream on the stovetop

  • You will need a large, wide heavy bottomed saucepan or a saute pan. This is essential so the water in the cream is able to evaporate, leaving no whey at the end.
  • Place cream and butter in your pan over a low to medium heat. Stir constantly with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula until it reaches a simmer.
  • Don’t let it boil and keep stirring until it’s reduced by half. Depending on your stove and how high you have the heat, about 20 minutes or so.
  • Pour into a shallow glass or ceramic dish, the larger the better. A larger surface area will give you more golden, buttery crust – the best bit !
  • Pop in the fridge overnight to firm up. If you’re in a rush, the cream will be ready to eat in a couple of hours but it does thicken more the longer you leave it.
Cream that has simmered down in a pan with a crust forming on the top.

How long does clotted cream last in the fridge ?

Kept in the fridge in an airtight container it will last for up to 7 days. Once opened use within 3 days.

A close up image of a scoop of thick buttery cream.

Can I freeze clotted cream ?

I wouldn’t recommend it. Like most dairy products clotted cream doesn’t fair well in the freezer. The texture is impaired, it becomes crumbly and doesn’t have the same creamy feel in the mouth.

However, it is safe to freeze clotted cream and it can work well for baking. Freeze fresh clotted cream for up to 3 months in an airtight container.

How to serve Homemade Clotted Cream

Serve with freshly baked scones and jam and a pot of tea.

However, clotted cream isn’t just for an afternoon tea. It’s perfect with a pudding or dessert. We love a dollop of clotted cream with our Nectarine Frangipane Tart or an apple pie or crumble. Oh, I nearly forgot – sticky toffee pudding too !

Don’t want to miss a thing ?

Follow me on PINTERESTINSTAGRAM, FACEBOOK, AND TWITTER!

If you like make from scratch recipes you might also like…..

Homemade Chilli Sauce

Best Ever Honeycomb

Homemade Stem Ginger

Homemade Clotted Cream is quick & easy to make. Deliciously decadent served with warm scones & homemade jam for a perfect cream tea.

Homemade Clotted Cream

Homemade Clotted Cream is quick & easy to make. Deliciously decadent served with warm scones & homemade jam for a perfect cream tea.
4.87 from 89 votes
Print Pin Rate this Recipe Save Recipe
Course: Afternoon Tea
Cuisine: British
Prep Time: 1 minute
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Cooling time: 12 hours
Total Time: 21 minutes
Servings: 16
Calories: 175kcal
Author: Sarah James

Equipment

  • A large wide heavy based saucepan or saute pan
  • A large shallow glass or ceramic dish

Ingredients

  • 750 ml double / heavy cream Guernsey cream if available
  • 30 g butter – ideally Guernsey butter

Instructions

  • Put the cream and butter in a large wide heavy based saucepan and place over a low to medium heat. Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until it reaches a simmer.
  • Don’t let it boil over and keep stirring so it doesn’t catch on the bottom.
  • Let it reduce by half – about 20 minutes.
  • Once it has reduced, pour into a shallow dish, the more surface area the better !
  • Let it cool, before covering and chilling in the fridge overnight.
  • Keep in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 7 days. Once opened use within 3 days.

Notes

1 serving = 2 tablespoons
Nutrition information is approximate and meant as a guideline only.
Calories: 175kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 19g | Saturated Fat: 12g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 68mg | Sodium: 31mg | Potassium: 36mg | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 736IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 31mg | Iron: 1mg

Pin for later

Top image is of a spoon of clotted cream being scraped up off a shallow dish.
Bottom image is of a split scone with jam and cream with a pot of cream in the background.

I’m linking Homemade Clotted Cream to:

Sharing is caring!

Recipe Rating




RubyD

Wednesday 14th of September 2022

It was very simple to make and the detailed instructions were excellent but it has turned out very, very thick. What would you recommend to thin it? Thanks!

RubyD

Wednesday 14th of September 2022

@Sarah James, it is more like HARD butter! I also made some using the oven method and it's much creamier and softer. I'm not sure why it's so stiff. I suppose leaving it out of the fridge for awhile would also help. I'm hesitant to add cream because I fear it might alter the flavour a bit.

Sarah James

Wednesday 14th of September 2022

Hello Ruby, thanks for your comment. The texture should be very thick, like a soft butter. You could try adding a little double cream to loosen it a little if you're finding your cream is too thick. Hope this helps, Sarah.

Jeff Northcott

Sunday 15th of May 2022

My other-half has just made it, and as a half Cornishman I will certainly let you know how it stands up to the store brought (rhoddas) and my family recipe for it (which if I remember is almost identical to this one, though my Great Aunt used to make enough for the whole street)

Sarah James

Tuesday 17th of May 2022

Thanks Jeff, I hope you enjoy our homemade clotted cream as much as we do. Look forward to hearing from you.

Elderberry Tart with Cassis - Tales From The Kitchen Shed

Tuesday 10th of November 2020

[…] Tart aux Myrtilles is the inspiration for my Elderberry Tart. I’ve used a rich butter pastry and used a small amount of custard flavoured with Creme de Cassis as a base for the elderberries for my version of this much loved tart. It truly is delicious, the elderberries adding just the right amount of tartness and fruitiness and if you’re like us you won’t be able to stop at just one slice. Serve cold ( if you can wait that long) with a dollop of creme fraiche or Homemade Clotted Cream. […]

Terry Schulz

Saturday 29th of August 2020

I just made this and the result is great, BUT it took 2 hr. I think I followed the recipe - heated the cream to the point I had to stir continuously to prevent foaming over. After 20 min there had been no reduction in level. After a bit more I reduced the heat slightly (temp was still 207 F and had some bubbles), but I didn't have to stir continuously. I checked every 5 min - had a little foam on top and stirred. Continued for 2 plus hr until the depth in the pan dropped from 2 1/4" to 1 1/8" (50%). Let cool in pan for an hour, then poured into metal pan and refrigerated overnight. Was very thick and tasty next morning. Is the best clotted cream I have made. My previous attempt used a large skillet simmer recipe where you spoon off the thick stuff from surface every 20 min or so. Also took several hours. Has anyone actually had this recipe work in 20 min?

sarahj

Monday 7th of September 2020

Hi Terry, the cream takes twenty minutes to reduce when I make clotted cream. Hobs do vary on a low heat and I used a large wide heavy based saucepan so there was plenty of surface area for the cream to reduce. Thanks for your feedback, so pleased your cream was very thick and tasty.

Lathiya

Tuesday 25th of August 2020

I never had or made clotted cream. Doesn't know that this is so easy to make. Looks great.